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Effect of a 2-hour interval between dinner and bedtime on glycated haemoglobin levels in middle-aged and elderly Japanese people: a longitudinal analysis of 3-year health check-up data
  1. Su Su Maw and
  2. Chiyori Haga
  1. Community Health Nursing, Graduate School of Health Sciences, Okayama University, Okayama City, Japan
  1. Correspondence to Su Su Maw, Community Health Nursing, Graduate School of Health Sciences, Okayama University, Okayama City 700-8530, Japan; susumaw1221{at}gmail.com

Abstract

Introduction There is a need for evidence-based measures to examine the risk factors for lifestyle-related diseases. In Japan, a 2-hour interval between dinner and sleep is recommended as a healthy practice. However, the effect of an appropriate duration between dinner and bedtime on glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels remains unclear. This study aimed to identify the effect of a duration of 2 hours or shorter between dinner and bedtime on HbA1c levels in middle-aged and elderly Japanese individuals.

Methods A longitudinal analysis of health check-up data (2012, 2013 and 2014) was performed. Lifestyle and anthropometric data of individuals aged 40–74 years who did not have any pre-diabetic and diabetic conditions were collected for multilevel analysis. Univariate analysis was performed to assess the influence of each lifestyle variable. Then, two-level random intercept models were created using statistical software SAS 9.3 (SAS Institute Inc, Cary, NC, USA).

Results The cohort comprised 1573 individuals in 2012, two-thirds of whom were women. The mean HbA1c level was 5.20% in 2012 and 5.58% in 2013 and 2014. A total of 83 (16.1%) men and 70 (7.5%) women fell asleep within 2 hours after dinner. The influence of ensuring a 2-hour interval between dinner and bedtime did not have a remarkable effect on increasing HbA1c levels. The regression coefficient of 2-hour interval and HbA1c levels over time was −0.02 (p=0.45). Smoking (p=0.013), alcohol consumption (p=0.010) and higher body mass index (BMI) (p<0.001) may have influenced HbA1c trends.

Conclusion Durations of 2 hours or shorter between dinner and bedtime did not influence HbA1c changes in middle-aged and elderly Japanese people. Instead, the focus should be on maintaining a normal BMI and abstaining from smoking and consuming alcohol to ensure stable HbA1c patterns in the long term.

  • dietary patterns
  • diabetes mellitus
  • metabolic syndrome
  • lifestyle factors

This is an open access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported (CC BY 4.0) license, which permits others to copy, redistribute, remix, transform and build upon this work for any purpose, provided the original work is properly cited, a link to the licence is given, and indication of whether changes were made. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

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Footnotes

  • Contributors SSM reviewed the literature, conducted the data analysis, and prepared the manuscript. CH prepared the research proposal, collected and analysed the data, and helped in writing the manuscript. Both authors checked and approved the final manuscript.

  • Funding This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI [grant number JP18K1102100]. The funding agency did not influence the study design; collection, analysis, and interpretation of data; manuscript writing; and decision for article publication.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

  • Ethics approval Ethical Review Board of Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences and Okayama University Hospital.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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